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Before hiring a planner to help with your finances, make sure to understand what you are paying for. Question the planner about his or her specific training and qualifications, fee structure, and services the professional will provide. Consider developing a list of questions when vetting a financial planner. Finally, check the disciplinary record and references for the planner to make sure you’re receiving the best quality financial guidance.

First, no computer model or customer service department is going to be able to match the level of service that can be provided by an on-site financial professional. Computer models often require a certain level of expertise to correctly interpret financials, and retirement plan customer service representatives are generally limited in the scope of advice they can provide to employees. Therefore, having a fiduciary advisor on staff will meet the employer's fiduciary requirements in a way that cannot be duplicated.
A good financial planner will not make recommendations until they understand your goals and have run a long-term financial plan for you. If you meet with someone who starts talking about a financial product right away, even if they call themselves a financial planner, they are more likely a financial salesperson. A good financial planner will want to gather account statements and data on all aspects of your financial life.
For more leads, check the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA). These planners are fee-only, which means their only revenue comes from their clients. They accept no commissions at all and pledge to act in their clients’ best interests at all times. In many respects, NAPFA standards meet or surpass the requirements needed for a CFP credential.
In 2005, amendments to the Malaysian Insurance Act require those who carry out financial advisory business (including financial planning activities related to insurance) and/or use the title of financial adviser under their firm (which, like in Singapore, must be a corporate structure) to obtain a license from Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM).[14] Some persons who offer financial advisory services, e.g., licensed life insurance agents, are exempted from licensing as a practising requirement.
financial expert means a nationally recognized independent appraiser or investment banker selected to assist in a determination of Fair Market Value. The fees and expenses of such Financial Expert shall be paid solely by the Corporation. If the Corporation and the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock are unable to agree upon a mutually acceptable Financial Expert within a period of thirty (30) days, then each of the Corporation and the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock shall designate a nationally recognized independent appraiser or investment banker, which two designees will be asked to select a third nationally recognized independent appraiser or investment banker to act as the Financial Expert hereunder. The selection of the Financial Expert by the two designees of the Corporation and of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock will be final. A Financial Expert selected to assist in a determination of the Fair Market Value of a share of Common Stock shall be instructed to determine such value based on the per share purchase price that a willing buyer would pay in an arm's-length purchase of all of the common equity of the Corporation.
In Singapore, financial services are highly regulated by The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), the regulator and supervisor of financial institutions in Singapore. Rules are set by MAS for financial institutions and are implemented through legislation, regulations, directions and notices.[15] Currently, the majority of the financial planners (financial consultants) are commission-based, which may cause a conflict of interest related to the products recommended. In 2015, a balanced scorecard framework was implemented to better align the interests of the FA industry and consumers. This ensures FA representatives and supervisors meet key performance indicators that are not related to sales, such as providing suitable product recommendations and making proper disclosure of material information to customers (Non-Sales KPI). Failure to achieve good grades for the Non-Sales KPI will directly affect their commission (variable income).
Choosing a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional is as important as choosing a doctor or lawyer; it's a very personal relationship. Many CFP® professionals specialize in working with certain types of clients, such as small-business owners, executives or retirees. Some specialize in certain areas of planning such as retirement, divorce or asset management. We recommend you interview at least three CFP® professionals to find the right one that best serves your needs.

The most commonly held professional designation is the certified financial planner (CFP®), which is owned and issued by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc., a nonprofit certifying and standards-setting organization that administers the CFP exam. Certified financial planner is a formal credential of expertise in the areas of financial planning, taxes, insurance, estate planning, and retirement. The designation is awarded to individuals who successfully complete the CFP® Board’s initial exams, then engage in ongoing annual education programs to maintain their skills and certification.
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