In this environment, there is always something new to consider, something old to revisit and something interesting just beyond the horizon. Keeping up with the industry is an important part of a financial services professional's life, and continuing education is required for many of these experts to maintain their credentials. What this means for the self-taught expert is that you will always have an opportunity to add to your body of knowledge.
You can certainly go it alone when it comes to managing your money. But you could also try to do it yourself when it comes to auto repair. In both areas, doing it yourself is a brilliant idea for some, and a flawed plan for many, many others. Mastering personal finance requires many hours of research and learning. For most, it’s not worth the time and ongoing effort.
A fiduciary advisor, by definition, is an advisor who is paid a retainer by an employer to advise employees on their retirement plan investments, as well as to provide a complete range of other products and services. Fiduciary advisors are not responsible for the entire company's retirement plan; they are only accountable for the advice which they give to employees on an individual basis.

After you have covered the basics and want a solid overview at a more detailed level, The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money & Investing is a great place to start. When you are done with that, your local library or bookstore will contain a variety of magazines covering both timely and general financial services topics. When you are ready to learn about equities, Value Line is a great publication that provides an introduction into how you can begin to research and analyze stocks. Even if you choose not to conduct your own stock analysis, the website is worth a visit.
The fiduciary advisor boom may be just around the corner, and prosperity may be awaiting those who can meet the selection criteria for this position, and subsequently to capitalize on it. The possible market base for fiduciary advisors includes all the 100 million households in the U.S.—quite a large base to draw from by any standard. Financial planners who are looking for a new way to grow their practices should investigate this possibility immediately.
You should also request a copy of a financial advisor’s Form ADV and Form CRS, which is paperwork the SEC requires advisory firms to file. This will provide information about an advisor’s business, pay structure, educational background, potential conflicts of interest and disciplinary history. That information is also available online through the SEC’s Investment Advisor Public Disclosure (IAPD) tool. You should also request a performance record and list of client references to contact.

Trying to reach your financial goals might seem like an intimidating task. But the good news is that you don’t have to do it alone. There are many successful people out there who are kind enough to share the steps they took to become financially free. Here are five accomplished individuals who are experts when it comes to saving money, paying down debt, and creating sustainable wealth.


Personal Capital funded a research study that found that nearly half of Americans erroneously believe all advisors are legally required to always act in their clients' best interest. Not only is this wrong, but it can also be damaging to the millions of savers and investors who unwittingly expose themselves to biased and potentially dangerous advice from advisors who can do what is best for themselves, at the expense of their clients.
For more leads, check the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA). These planners are fee-only, which means their only revenue comes from their clients. They accept no commissions at all and pledge to act in their clients’ best interests at all times. In many respects, NAPFA standards meet or surpass the requirements needed for a CFP credential.

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financial expert means a nationally recognized independent appraiser or investment banker selected to assist in a determination of Fair Market Value. The fees and expenses of such Financial Expert shall be paid solely by the Corporation. If the Corporation and the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock are unable to agree upon a mutually acceptable Financial Expert within a period of thirty (30) days, then each of the Corporation and the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock shall designate a nationally recognized independent appraiser or investment banker, which two designees will be asked to select a third nationally recognized independent appraiser or investment banker to act as the Financial Expert hereunder. The selection of the Financial Expert by the two designees of the Corporation and of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock will be final. A Financial Expert selected to assist in a determination of the Fair Market Value of a share of Common Stock shall be instructed to determine such value based on the per share purchase price that a willing buyer would pay in an arm's-length purchase of all of the common equity of the Corporation.
The planner might have a specialty in investments, taxes, retirement, and/or estate planning. Further, the financial planner may hold various licenses or designations, such as Certified Financial Planner (CFP), Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC), or Certified Investment Management Analyst (CIMA), among others. To obtain each of these licensures, the financial planner must complete a different set of education, examination, and work history requirements.
This is a broad term for a professional who helps manage your money. You pay the advisor, and in exchange, they help with any number of money-related tasks. A financial advisor might help manage investments, broker the sale and purchase of stocks and funds, or create a comprehensive estate and tax plan. If the advisor is working with the public, they must hold a Series 65 license. In addition to that license, there are many other financial advisor credentials the advisor might hold, depending upon the services that are provided.
FeeOnlyNetwork.com and Advisorology, LLC (its parent company) are not affiliated with any financial planning firm, affiliation or accreditation board and does not hold itself out as providing any legal, financial or other advice. FeeOnlyNetwork.com does not make any recommendation or endorsement as to any advisor, financial planner or other service, product, entity or individual or to any material submitted by third parties or linked to or from this website.
Another good bet could be a planner in the Garrett Planning Network, a group of certified financial planners who all pledge to make themselves available for smaller projects for an hourly fee. All of the members of this network are CFPs or they’re actively working towards this designation. It may be that you just have a handful of questions, and someone here could help you without charging too much.
There are thousands of in-person and online courses available to help educate you about finance and investing. Many universities offer free or paid online courses you can take at anytime. We created the Investopedia Academy in 2018 to help people learn everything from investing, trading, and money management to personal finance. Check it out here and find the right course for you.
A growing number of financial planners make money only when you pay them a fee for their counsel. These independent financial planners don’t get a cut from life insurers or fund companies. You might pay them a flat fee, such as $1,500, for a financial plan. Or you could pay an annual fee, often 1% of all the assets—investment, retirement, college-savings and other accounts—they’re minding for you. Others charge by the hour, like lawyers.
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